City Seeking Public Input on ‘Dockless Vehicles’

posted by 1200 WOAI - 

By Morgan Montalvo 

WOAI News   

City officials want to hear from the public as interest in, and use of,  so-called dockless vehicles pick up speed, News Radio 1200 WOAI reports. 

 The diminutive, battery-powered, two-wheeled scooters bridge the gap  between skateboards and larger means of transportation and offer  short-range convenience at the touch of an app and entry of a credit  card number.   

With two companies now offering the scooters for point-to-point  conveyance, and more firms positioning to enter the San Antonio market,  bureaucrats see now as the time to formulate use policy that allows the  market to flourish while protecting street and sidewalk accessibility.  

 “Are they concerned about how they’re being parked, are they concerned  about how they’re being used?” says John Jacks with the city’s Center  City Department. “That way, we can draft some regulations that really  kind of reasonably address people’s concerns, but also give enough  flexibility for people to use them.”   

About 150 people attended Tuesday evening’s City of San  Antonio-sponsored information session on dockless vehicles at the  Downtown Public Library. 

At the gathering, attendees were asked to share  on cards and poster boards their thoughts about a range of concerns,  including safety, permitting, age restrictions and use areas.   

For local cyclist Damian Cruz, safety is Priority One.   

“I’ve never lived in a city where I’ve seen so much bike-related  incidents,” says Cruz, a New York City native and IT student who has  ridden dockless vehicles around Downtown San Antonio and also monitored  their use in San Francisco and Cincinnati.

   “I think they’re really cool. They’re fun.  Safety is the only thing I’m worried about,” Cruz says.  

"Dockless vehicle"  scooters line the sidewalk outside the Downtown Public Library during  Tuesday evening's City of San Antonio-sponsored community forum on the  emerging form of short-range rental transportation. Photo by Morgan  Montalvo

title

Content Goes Here