Hottest Temps are Over, but New Heat Advisory Issued

posted by 1200 WOAI - 

Hot enough for you?

1200 WOAI news reports the official high in San Antonio on Monday was 105 degrees, making it the hottest July 23rd ever, breaking a record set in 1994.

But that doesn't break the record of 106 for the hottest day ever in July, set in 1989, or the hottest day ever in the city, 111 degrees, set on September 5, 2000.

But to the north of us, all time records were set.  Austin recorded 110 degrees at Camp Mabry, Llano reported 111 degrees, and Waco set an all time record high for the Central Texas city of 114 degrees.

Meanwhile...for today from the National Weather Servide:

Heat Advisory in effect for Uvalde, Medina, Frio, Bexar, and Atascosa County.

Threats & Impacts: 

High Temperatures:  Counties in Heat Advisory: 102-104 DegreesHill Country: 97-100 DegreesCoastal Plains: 99-101 DegreesRio Grande Plains: 106-108 Degrees (Criteria is higher for Heat Advisory)

Impacts:   Prolonged exposure to this excessive heat could lead to dehydration,  heat exhaustion or even heat stroke, especially for areas in the Heat  Advisory.

Overview:

A  weak frontal boundary will bring slightly cooler weather for much of  the area, but highs near and southwest of San Antonio will remain in the  102-108 degree range and a Heat Advisory has been issued for Uvalde,  Medina, Frio, Bexar, and Atascosa County. Heat index values will  approach 107 degrees for much of the area and caution must continue to  be exercised across all areas today .Take  extra precautions if you must work or spend time outside. Wear light  weight and loose fitting clothing, drink plenty of water, and take  frequent breaks, preferably in an air conditioned areas, If possible,  reschedule strenuous activities for the morning or late evening hours to  avoid the heat of the day.Young  children and pets should never be left unattended in vehicles under any  circumstances. This is especially true during hot weather when car  interiors can reach lethal temperatures in a matter of minutes. Look  before you lock!

GRAPHIC; NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE



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