Nine of Ten Amendments Approved

Texas voters were in a 'yes' kind of mood on Election Day, approving nine of the ten Constitutional Amendments on the ballot, News Radio 1200 WOAI reports.

The only amendment that did not pass was a measure that would have allowed municipal court judges to serve in multiple jurisdictions. It was pushed by rural lawmakers as a solution to the fact that frequently, small towns have trouble finding qualified people who are willing to serve as municipal judges. Currently, appointed municipal court judges, but not elected ones, are allowed to serve in multiple jurisdictions.

Voters said yes to the most hotly contested item on the ballot. By a margin of 76% support...voters said the Legislature cannot approve a state income tax in the future without the approval of the people in a constitutional amendment election. There had been controversy over this measure because of the ballot wording. A YES vote was a vote of NO on a state income tax.

The other amendments were also approved.

Voters said yes to writing in the constitution that sales tax revenue from the sale of sporting goods must go to maintenance of state parks. Voters said the Legislature should have the right to reduce or forgive property taxes on property which is damaged in a disaster, and voters overwhelmingly agreed to double the amount of money that the state can put into the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. CIPRIT has been very successful in helping efforts to work on treatments and cures for cancer, and come up with preventions for cancer. The measure allows up to $6 billion in bonds to be sold for CIPRIT.

By an unprecedented 94% majority, the voters said yes to Proposition Ten, which will allow retired police and fire dogs to be adopted by their handlers. Current state law considers the animals to be 'surplus property.'

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