WASHINGTON - DECEMBER 8:  The U.S. House of Representatives chamber is seen December 8, 2008 in Washington, DC. Members of the media were allowed access to film and photograph the room for the first time in six years.  (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Imag

CREDIT: GETTY IMAGES

Threats to members of Congress have jumped in 2017, with the U.S. Capitol Police investigating more threats against lawmakers in the first six months of this year than in all of 2016. That's according to the House Sergeant at Arms, Paul Irving, who provided the numbers to the Federal Election Commission as lawmakers are seeking their counsel on whether they can use campaign funds to improve security at their homes. Irving placed blame on social media, writing to the FEC, "The increased used of social media has created a new avenue for individuals with ill intent to publish threatening communications directed toward members of the House of Representatives. The anonymous nature of these postings makes it particularly challenging for the United States Capitol Police . . . " The information comes after House Majority Whip Steve Scalise was critically injured nearly a month ago when he was shot at a congressional Republicans' baseball practice when a gunman who was upset with President Trump and Republicans opened fire. Scalise remains hospitalized.